//Bullying
Bullying2018-09-14T12:02:14+00:00

Bullying

Bullying

Bullying

Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose. Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Bullying is linked to many negative outcomes including impacts on mental health, substance use, and suicide.

Types of bullying:

There are four types of bullying:

  • Verbal bullying is saying or writing mean things.
  • Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships.
  • Physical bullying involves hurting a person’s body or possessions.
  • Electronic or Cyber-bullying involves using an electronic medium, such as email, websites, a social media platform, text messages, or videos posted on websites or sent through phones, to threaten or harm others.

Why Cyberbullying is Different:

People who are being cyberbullied are often bullied in person as well. Additionally, kids who are cyberbullied have a harder time getting away from the behavior.

  • Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and reach a kid even when he or she is alone. It can happen any time of the day or night.
  • Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to trace the source.
  • Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent.

Effects of Cyberbullying

Cell phones and computers themselves are not to blame for cyberbullying. Social media sites can be used for positive activities, like connecting kids with friends and family, helping students with school, and for entertainment. But these tools can also be used to hurt other people. Whether done in person or through technology, the effects of bullying are similar.

Kids who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school / work / events
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Receive poor grades / work performance lowers
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Suffer from depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts

Warning Signs of Bullying:

There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying—either being bullied or bullying others. Recognizing the warning signs is an important first step in taking action against bullying. Not all children who are bullied or are bullying others ask for help.
It is important to talk with children who show signs of being bullied or bullying others. These warning signs can also point to other issues or problems, such as depression or substance abuse.

Talking can help identify the root of the problem and prevent the possible long term physical and mental effects that follow youth into adulthood such as:

  • Agoraphobia
  • Anxiety, anti-social personality and other panic disorders.
  • Depression
  • Sleep Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Self-Harm and Suicide

The Relationship between Bullying and Suicide:

Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Bullying is linked to many negative outcomes including impacts on mental health, substance use, and suicide. It is important to talk to kids to determine whether bullying—or something else—is a concern. Although kids who are bullied are at risk of suicide, bullying alone is not the cause. Many issues contribute to suicide risk, including depression, problems at home, and trauma history. Additionally, specific groups have an increased risk of suicide, including American Indian and Alaskan Native, Asian American, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. This risk can be increased further when these kids are not supported by parents, peers, and schools. Bullying can make an unsupportive situation worse.

Types of bullying:

There are four types of bullying:

  • Verbal bullying is saying or writing mean things.
  • Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships.
  • Physical bullying involves hurting a person’s body or possessions.
  • Electronic or Cyber-bullying involves using an electronic medium, such as email, websites, a social media platform, text messages, or videos posted on websites or sent through phones, to threaten or harm others.

Why Cyberbullying is Different:

People who are being cyberbullied are often bullied in person as well. Additionally, kids who are cyberbullied have a harder time getting away from the behavior.

  • Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and reach a kid even when he or she is alone. It can happen any time of the day or night.
  • Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to trace the source.
  • Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent.

Effects of Cyberbullying

Cell phones and computers themselves are not to blame for cyberbullying. Social media sites can be used for positive activities, like connecting kids with friends and family, helping students with school, and for entertainment. But these tools can also be used to hurt other people. Whether done in person or through technology, the effects of bullying are similar.

Kids who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school / work / events
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Receive poor grades / work performance lowers
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Suffer from depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts

Warning Signs of Bullying:

There are many warning signs that may indicate that someone is affected by bullying—either being bullied or bullying others. Recognizing the warning signs is an important first step in taking action against bullying. Not all children who are bullied or are bullying others ask for help.
It is important to talk with children who show signs of being bullied or bullying others. These warning signs can also point to other issues or problems, such as depression or substance abuse.

Talking can help identify the root of the problem and prevent the possible long term physical and mental effects that follow youth into adulthood such as:

  • Agoraphobia
  • Anxiety, anti-social personality and other panic disorders.
  • Depression
  • Sleep Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Self-Harm and Suicide

The Relationship between Bullying and Suicide:

Bullying can affect everyone—those who are bullied, those who bully, and those who witness bullying. Bullying is linked to many negative outcomes including impacts on mental health, substance use, and suicide. It is important to talk to kids to determine whether bullying—or something else—is a concern. Although kids who are bullied are at risk of suicide, bullying alone is not the cause. Many issues contribute to suicide risk, including depression, problems at home, and trauma history. Additionally, specific groups have an increased risk of suicide, including American Indian and Alaskan Native, Asian American, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. This risk can be increased further when these kids are not supported by parents, peers, and schools. Bullying can make an unsupportive situation worse.

FINDING HELP

If there has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911.

If someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline through their website:

 

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or by phone

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 
Suicide Prevention Life Line

FINDING HELP

If there has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911.

If someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline through their website:

 

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or by phone

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 
Suicide Prevention Life Line

FINDING HELP

If there has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911.

If someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline through their website:

 

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or by phone

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 
Suicide Prevention Life Line