Bullying

Bullying

Bullying

A bully uses physical force, verbal threats, or coercion to abuse, dominate, or intimidate others in order to establish a position of physical or social superiority. Bullies also spread rumors or exclude people from groups. Bullying is usually repeated over a period of time.

Types of bullying:

There are four types of bullying:

  • Verbal bullying
  • Physical bullying
  • Cyber bullying – bullying via cell phones, emails, and social media posts
  • Social bullying – mocking, excluding, spreading rumors

Why Cyberbullying is Different:

Cyberbullying is the relentless, 24/7 bullying of an individual (both online and in person if the bully is local). It’s usually done anonymously, and the damage spreads through social media channels quickly, making it impossible to shut down.

Children who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school / work / events
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Receive poor grades / work performance lowers
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Suffer from depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts

Warning Signs of Bullying:

Many bullied children will stay silent about their abuse, so watch for the warning signs. The following signs are also indicators of depression or substance abuse.

  • Agoraphobia
  • Anxiety, anti-social personality and other panic disorders.
  • Depression
  • Sleep Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Self-Harm and Suicide

The Relationship between Bullying and Suicide:

Because bullying has the effect of making victims and witnesses feel alone, excluded, devoid of self-esteem, and helpless, it can lead to mental health issues, substance, and suicide.

People don’t only have suicidal thoughts because of bullying though; other major contributors are mental health disorders, abuse, and trauma. Certain bullied groups are more inclined to consider suicide than others, including American Indian and Alaskan Native, Asian American, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth, especially when these children are not supported by parents, peers, and schools.

 

Types of bullying:

There are four types of bullying:

  • Verbal bullying
  • Physical bullying
  • Cyber bullying – bullying via cell phones, emails, and social media posts
  • Social bullying – mocking, excluding, spreading rumors
 

Why Cyberbullying is Different:

Cyberbullying is the relentless, 24/7 bullying of an individual (both online and in person if the bully is local). It’s usually done anonymously, and the damage spreads through social media channels quickly, making it impossible to shut down.

Children who are cyberbullied are more likely to:

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school / work / events
  • Experience in-person bullying
  • Receive poor grades / work performance lowers
  • Have lower self-esteem
  • Suffer from depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts
 

Warning Signs of Bullying:

Many bullied children will stay silent about their abuse, so watch for the warning signs. The following signs are also indicators of depression or substance abuse.

  • Agoraphobia
  • Anxiety, anti-social personality and other panic disorders.
  • Depression
  • Sleep Disorders
  • Eating Disorders
  • Self-Harm and Suicide
 

The Relationship between Bullying and Suicide:

Because bullying has the effect of making victims and witnesses feel alone, excluded, devoid of self-esteem, and helpless, it can lead to mental health issues, substance, and suicide.

People don’t only have suicidal thoughts because of bullying though; other major contributors are mental health disorders, abuse, and trauma. Certain bullied groups are more inclined to consider suicide than others, including American Indian and Alaskan Native, Asian American, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth, especially when these children are not supported by parents, peers, and schools.

Source stopbullying.gov

FINDING HELP

If there has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911.

If someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline through their website:

 

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or by phone

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 
Suicide Prevention Life Line

FINDING HELP

If there has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911.

If someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline through their website:

 

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or by phone

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 
Suicide Prevention Life Line

FINDING HELP

If there has been a crime or someone is at immediate risk of harm. Call 911.

If someone is feeling hopeless, helpless, thinking of suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline through their website:

 

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

or by phone

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 
Suicide Prevention Life Line