Shared Psychotic Disorder

Shared Psychotic Disorder

Shared Psychotic Disorder

A A delusion is a fixed, false belief held with absolute certainty despite strong evidence to the contrary. The belief is also inconsistent with the cultural and religious norms of the affected individual(s).

Shared psychotic disorder is when a delusional belief is transmitted from one person to another or others. Folie a deux is when two people share the delusional belief, folie à trois when three people share it and so on. An entire family can share a delusional belief, in which case the condition is referred to as folie en famille or family madness.

The diagnostic term “shared psychotic disorder” was introduced in the American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition (DSM-4). This term; however, has been removed from DSM-5, and the condition has been subsumed under the category “other specified schizophrenia spectrum” and “other psychotic disorder.”

Symptoms of Shared Psychotic Disorders:

There are several types of delusions that are transmitted from one person to another in a shared psychotic disorder. These include:

  • Bizarre delusions – beliefs that are obviously implausible and not understood and accepted by others in the same religion or culture
  • Non-bizarre delusions – beliefs that are realistic and are understood and accepted by others in the same religion or culture

DiagnosisShared psychotic disorder is most commonly diagnosed when the two or more people who share the belief live in proximity to one another and they are socially and/or physically isolated from society.

Causes of Shared Psychotic Disorders:

The exact causes of shared anxiety disorder remain unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors have been implicated.

Various subclassifications of folie à deux have been proposed to describe how the delusional belief can be transmitted to other people. For example, folie imposée is where a dominant person — known as the “primary,” “inducer,” or “principal” — initially forms a delusional belief during a psychotic episode and imposes it on another person or persons — known as the “secondary,” “acceptor,” or “associate.”

Risks of Shared Psychotic Disorders:

Shared psychotic disorder can cause impairment in functioning at home, work, school, or social settings and often exists with other conditions such as major depressive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder.

Treatment for Shared Psychotic Disorder:

Treatment for shared psychotic disorder includes:

  • Medication – antipsychotics such as Olanzapine
  • Psychotherapy – such as cognitive behavioral therapy

Hospitalization is required if symptoms are severe and/or there are concerns regarding the safety of those affected and/or others.

If the people involved are admitted to hospital separately, then the delusions in the person with the induced beliefs usually resolve without the need of medication.

 

Symptoms of Shared Psychotic Disorders:

There are several types of delusions that are transmitted from one person to another in a shared psychotic disorder. These include:

  • Bizarre delusions – beliefs that are obviously implausible and not understood and accepted by others in the same religion or culture
  • Non-bizarre delusions – beliefs that are realistic and are understood and accepted by others in the same religion or culture

DiagnosisShared psychotic disorder is most commonly diagnosed when the two or more people who share the belief live in proximity to one another and they are socially and/or physically isolated from society.

 

Causes of Shared Psychotic Disorders:

The exact causes of shared anxiety disorder remain unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors have been implicated.

Various subclassifications of folie à deux have been proposed to describe how the delusional belief can be transmitted to other people. For example, folie imposée is where a dominant person — known as the “primary,” “inducer,” or “principal” — initially forms a delusional belief during a psychotic episode and imposes it on another person or persons — known as the “secondary,” “acceptor,” or “associate.”

 

Risks of Shared Psychotic Disorders:

Shared psychotic disorder can cause impairment in functioning at home, work, school, or social settings and often exists with other conditions such as major depressive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder.

 

Treatment for Shared Psychotic Disorder:

Treatment for shared psychotic disorder includes:

  • Medication – antipsychotics such as Olanzapine
  • Psychotherapy – such as cognitive behavioral therapy

Hospitalization is required if symptoms are severe and/or there are concerns regarding the safety of those affected and/or others.

If the people involved are admitted to hospital separately, then the delusions in the person with the induced beliefs usually resolve without the need of medication.

Sources WEBMD