Cannabis Dependence2018-09-27T16:07:21+00:00

Cannabis Dependence

Cannabis Dependence

Cannabis Dependence

Recent data suggest that 30 percent of those who use marijuana may have some degree of marijuana use disorder. People who begin using Cannabis before the age of 18 are four to seven times more likely to develop a Cannabis use disorder than those who began using Cannabis as an adult. Cannabis use disorders are often associated with dependence, in which a person feels withdrawal symptoms when not taking the drug. Dependence occurs when the brain adapts to large amounts of the drug by reducing production of and sensitivity to its own endocannabinoid neurotransmitters.

The main active chemical in Cannabis is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). When someone smokes Cannabis (AKA: Marijuana), THC rapidly passes from the lungs into the bloodstream, which carries the chemical to the brain. THC acts on specific places in the brain, called cannabinoid receptors, producing a series of cellular reactions that ultimately lead to the high that users seek. Some brain areas have many cannabinoid receptors; others have few or none. The highest density of cannabinoid receptors are found in parts of the brain that influence pleasure, memory, thoughts, concentration, sensory and time perception, and coordinated movement.

When a person regularly uses Cannabis, it is not unusual for them to develop a tolerance to it. This means the person needs to smoke to achieve the same initial effects. Frequent and heavy use of marijuana can lead to a physical dependence. Cannabis Dependency occurs when a person’s body adapts to the marijuana and is only used to functioning properly when the Cannabis is used. It is also not unusual for people who use Cannabis to develop a psychological dependence. This usually sees the person become obsessed with the drug, allowing it to become the biggest priority in their life. Psychological dependence is often what makes people crave the Cannabis and what makes it difficult for people to stop using it. Some people do not understand they are dependent on Cannabis and others may be too embarrassed to seek professional help.

Symptoms of Cannabis Dependence or Abuse:

Acute stress disorder is most often diagnosed when an individual has been exposed to a traumatic event in which both of the following were present:

  • Distorted Perceptions
  • Impaired Coordination
  • Difficulty in thinking and problem solving
  • Constant problems with learning and memory
  • Anxiety that does not go away or actually gets worse as a result of smoking pot
  • Depression or a depressed state
  • Social intolerance or a lack of desire to be social
  • Schizophrenia or feeling like everyone is out to get you
  • Acute psychotic reactions

Withdrawal and Detoxification:

Although withdrawal from Cannabis is not as difficult as withdrawal from other drugs, other drug withdrawal, it can cause psychological disruptions. This is what makes a person most prone to relapsing.

Withdrawal from Cannabis can cause symptoms such as
  • Insomnia
  • Excessive Sweating
  • Depression
  • Anxiety Attacks

These withdrawal symptoms typically last between two and twelve days, although this does depend on individual circumstances. Abruptly stopping the use of marijuana without the support of professionals can be difficult. Someone who attends a medically supervised rehabilitation program is much more likely to make a successful recovery.

Treatment for, and recovery from, Cannabis dependance:

Cannabis does not have an alternative substance that can be taken during rehabilitation like other drugs that can lead to dependency. However, the symptoms of Cannabis abuse treatment are usually easier to handle with the biggest challenge for a person dealing with withdrawal is resisting the strong urge to use again and relieve the physical withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is often recommended a person attended a supervised program at a rehabilitation center as oppose to semi-supervised rehabilitation in their home.

The Path To Recovery From Cannabis Dependency

  • Family and friends
  • Others who are in recovery living without Cannabis
  • Aftercare
  • Therapy and Counseling
  • Community and Online support groups

Symptoms of Cannabis Dependence or Abuse:

Acute stress disorder is most often diagnosed when an individual has been exposed to a traumatic event in which both of the following were present:

  • Distorted Perceptions
  • Impaired Coordination
  • Difficulty in thinking and problem solving
  • Constant problems with learning and memory
  • Anxiety that does not go away or actually gets worse as a result of smoking pot
  • Depression or a depressed state
  • Social intolerance or a lack of desire to be social
  • Schizophrenia or feeling like everyone is out to get you
  • Acute psychotic reactions

Withdrawal and Detoxification:

Although withdrawal from Cannabis is not as difficult as withdrawal from other drugs, other drug withdrawal, it can cause psychological disruptions. This is what makes a person most prone to relapsing.

Withdrawal from Cannabis can cause symptoms such as
  • Insomnia
  • Excessive Sweating
  • Depression
  • Anxiety Attacks

These withdrawal symptoms typically last between two and twelve days, although this does depend on individual circumstances. Abruptly stopping the use of marijuana without the support of professionals can be difficult. Someone who attends a medically supervised rehabilitation program is much more likely to make a successful recovery.

Treatment for, and recovery from, Cannabis dependance:

Cannabis does not have an alternative substance that can be taken during rehabilitation like other drugs that can lead to dependency. However, the symptoms of Cannabis abuse treatment are usually easier to handle with the biggest challenge for a person dealing with withdrawal is resisting the strong urge to use again and relieve the physical withdrawal symptoms. For this reason, it is often recommended a person attended a supervised program at a rehabilitation center as oppose to semi-supervised rehabilitation in their home.

The Path To Recovery From Cannabis Dependency

  • Family and friends
  • Others who are in recovery living without Cannabis
  • Aftercare
  • Therapy and Counseling
  • Community and Online support groups
Source SAMHSA