Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a childhood condition that is characterized by defiant, disruptive, and disobedient behaviors such as arguing or answering back to adults and authority figures such as parents and teachers.

ODD vs Conduct Disorder

There is often confusion between ODD and Conduct Disorder. Although there is some overlap between the two, the behaviors seen in those with ODD are usually less severe — their behaviors aren’t usually aggressive and/or destructive resulting in harm to others and damage to property, while those with Conduct Disorders are.

Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

Children with ODD might deliberately and persistently test limits by refusing to follow rules and requests set by adults and by never taking the blame for their misbehavior. Other examples of behaviors that children with ODD display include:

  • Throwing repeated temper tantrums
  • Having frequent outbursts of anger and resentment
  • Deliberately trying to annoy, antagonize, or upset others
  • Being spiteful and seeking revenge
  • Swearing or using obscene language
  • Saying cruel, hostile, and hateful words, especially when upset

ODD mostly happens in home and/or school settings, but children can also behave this way in social settings.

Medications for Oppositional Defiant Disorder can include:

For a diagnosis of ODD to be made in children, the behaviors must:

  • Be present for at least six months
  • Cause significant impairment in social and scholastic functioning
  • Happen far more often than is typically observed in children of the same age and developmental level

Treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

The earlier the intervention, the better the outcome. It is important for parents and teachers to recognize the behaviors of ODD early so that treatment can be started as soon as possible.

  • Behavioral – implemented through parent training
  • Medication – not recommended in the treatment of ODD

Outlook for Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

Milder forms of ODD often get better as the child grows older. In some cases, children with more severe forms of ODD can develop a Conduct Disorder.

Symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

Children with ODD might deliberately and persistently test limits by refusing to follow rules and requests set by adults and by never taking the blame for their misbehavior. Other examples of behaviors that children with ODD display include:

  • Throwing repeated temper tantrums
  • Having frequent outbursts of anger and resentment
  • Deliberately trying to annoy, antagonize, or upset others
  • Being spiteful and seeking revenge
  • Swearing or using obscene language
  • Saying cruel, hostile, and hateful words, especially when upset

ODD mostly happens in home and/or school settings, but children can also behave this way in social settings.

Diagnosis of Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

For a diagnosis of ODD to be made in children, the behaviors must:

  • Be present for at least six months
  • Cause significant impairment in social and scholastic functioning
  • Happen far more often than is typically observed in children of the same age and developmental level

Treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

The earlier the intervention, the better the outcome. It is important for parents and teachers to recognize the behaviors of ODD early so that treatment can be started as soon as possible.

  • Behavioral – implemented through parent training
  • Medication – not recommended in the treatment of ODD
.

Outlook for Oppositional Defiant Disorder:

Milder forms of ODD often get better as the child grows older. In some cases, children with more severe forms of ODD can develop a Conduct Disorder.

Sources PSYCH CENTRAL | WEBMD – Temper Tantrums