Cyclothymic Disorder

Cyclothymic Disorder

Cyclothymic Disorder

CCyclothymia, also known as cyclothymic disorder, is a mood disorder that looks like a milder form of bipolar disorder types I and II. Cyclothymia is characterized by episodes of depressive symptoms and periods of hypomanic symptoms which are not ample enough to warrant a diagnosis of major depressive disorder or hypomania.

Prevalence

The rates for cyclothymia range from 0.4 to 8% depending on the study, and it affects males and females equally. The typical age of onset of cyclothymia is in late childhood and early adulthood.

Symptoms of Cyclothymic Disorder:

Hypomanic symptoms include:

  • An exaggerated feeling of happiness or well-being – euphoria
  • Inflated self-esteem
  • Loquacity – talking more than usual
  • Impulsivity
  • Racing thoughts and/or rapid speech
  • Irritability and/or agitation
  • Increased energy and/or libido (sex drive)
  • Decreased desire and/or need for sleep

Depressive symptoms include:

  • Low mood
  • Anhedonia – loss of joy in activities that were once pleasurable
  • Feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness, and guilt
  • Tearfulness
  • Fatigue
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Reduced energy
  • Sleep disturbances

Diagnosing Cyclothymic Disorder:

Cyclothymia tends to be underdiagnosed due to its relatively milder symptomatology.

  • Symptoms of cyclothymia must persist for at least one year in children and adolescents and two years in adults.
  • People with cyclothymia can experience periods of a stable mood; however, the stability does not last any longer than two months.

Cyclothymic Disorder Complications:

The symptoms of cyclothymia can interfere significantly in the ability to function well in social, academic, occupational, and relational settings.

With regards to romantic relationships, people with cyclothymia can experience increased libido (desire for sexual activity) that be intense during hypomanic phases; and they can become reclusive and can have reduced sex drive during depressive phases. This can lead to individuals with cyclothymia having short-lived and tumultuous relationships.

Causes of Cyclothymic Disorder

The cause of cyclothymia remains unknown. Individuals who have a family history of cyclothymia are at increased risk of developing this mood disorder.

Cyclothymia commonly coexists with other conditions such as eating disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Risks of Cyclothymic Disorder:

People with cyclothymia are at increased risk of developing full-blown bipolar affective disorder — bipolar type I or bipolar type II.

Individuals with cyclothymia are also at increased risk of suicide and self-harm.

Treatment of Cyclothymic Disorder:

Cyclothymia requires lifelong treatment — even during periods when they feel better — usually guided by a mental health professional.

Treatment options for cyclothymia include:

  • Modifying lifestyle – exercise and having a healthy diet
  • Talking therapies – such as cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Mood-stabilizing medicines – such as lithium (however, the evidence for psychiatric drugs is limited)

Symptoms of Cyclothymic Disorder:

Hypomanic symptoms include:

  • An exaggerated feeling of happiness or well-being – euphoria
  • Inflated self-esteem
  • Loquacity – talking more than usual
  • Impulsivity
  • Racing thoughts and/or rapid speech
  • Irritability and/or agitation
  • Increased energy and/or libido (sex drive)
  • Decreased desire and/or need for sleep

Depressive symptoms include:

  • Low mood
  • Anhedonia – loss of joy in activities that were once pleasurable
  • Feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness, and guilt
  • Tearfulness
  • Fatigue
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Reduced energy
  • Sleep disturbances

Diagnosing Cyclothymic Disorder:

Cyclothymia tends to be underdiagnosed due to its relatively milder symptomatology.

  • Symptoms of cyclothymia must persist for at least one year in children and adolescents and two years in adults.
  • People with cyclothymia can experience periods of a stable mood; however, the stability does not last any longer than two months.

Cyclothymic Disorder complications:

The symptoms of cyclothymia can interfere significantly in the ability to function well in social, academic, occupational, and relational settings.

With regards to romantic relationships, people with cyclothymia can experience increased libido (desire for sexual activity) that be intense during hypomanic phases; and they can become reclusive and can have reduced sex drive during depressive phases. This can lead to individuals with cyclothymia having short-lived and tumultuous relationships.

Causes of Cyclothymic Disorder:

The cause of cyclothymia remains unknown. Individuals who have a family history of cyclothymia are at increased risk of developing this mood disorder.

Cyclothymia commonly coexists with other conditions such as eating disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Risks of Cyclothymic Disorder:

People with cyclothymia are at increased risk of developing full-blown bipolar affective disorder — bipolar type I or bipolar type II.

Individuals with cyclothymia are also at increased risk of suicide and self-harm.

Treatment of Cyclothymic Disorder:

Cyclothymia requires lifelong treatment — even during periods when they feel better — usually guided by a mental health professional.

Treatment options for cyclothymia include:

  • Modifying lifestyle – exercise and having a healthy diet
  • Talking therapies – such as cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Mood-stabilizing medicines – such as lithium (however, the evidence for psychiatric drugs is limited)
Sources MAYO CLINIC | WIKIPEDIA – Mental Disorder