Multi-Infarct Dementia

Multi-Infarct Dementia

Multi-Infarct Dementia

Multi-Infarct dementia, also known as Vascular dementia is a syndrome characterized by progressive, usually irreversible deficits in conscious intellectual activity.

Prevalence

Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia following Alzheimer’s disease in people over the age of 65.

Symptoms of Multi-Infarct Dementia:

The clinical features of dementia include:

  • Fragmentation of memory
  • Language problems – comprehension and expression
  • Reduced efficiency with activities of daily living
  • Behavioral and psychological symptoms – aggression, wandering, depression, anxiety. apathy
  • Personality and intellectual disintegration

Symptoms of vascular dementia may begin suddenly or gradually after each stroke. Some people with vascular dementia may improve for short periods but decline after having further “silent” strokes. The symptoms of a vascular stroke follow a stepwise progression — the dementia worsens with each stroke.

Causes of Multi-Infarct Dementia:

Multi-Infarct dementia is caused by a reduced flow of blood to the brain usually as a result of a series of small strokes. A stroke, also known as an infarct, is a disturbance in or blockage of the blood supply to any part of the brain. Multi-infarct means that more than one area in the brain has been injured due to a compromised blood supply.

Risk Factors for Multi-Infarct Dementia:

The following risk factors render a person more vulnerable to developing Multi-Infarct dementia:

  • Diabetes
  • Atherosclerosis – a furring or hardening of the arteries that can result in narrowing and blockage
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke

Multi-Infarct or vascular dementia can often coexist with Alzheimer’s disease; this is known as mixed dementia.

Diagnosing Multi-Infarct Dementia:

Multi-Infarct dementia is diagnosed in a specialist setting usually by an older-age or later-life psychiatrist.

Treatment of Multi-Infarct Dementia:

There is no cure for Multi-Infarct dementia, and the aim of therapy is to treat risk factors and to prevent future strokes. This can be achieved by:

  • Lifestyle modification – by improving diet and exercising more
  • Moderating or eliminating alcohol consumption
  • Stopping smoking
  • Keeping a close eye on blood pressure to make sure that it is within a healthy range and, if not, starting anti-hypertensive medication
  • Blood thinners such as aspirin may also be started by the person’s doctor to help prevent clots from forming and clogging up arteries

Providing support to people with Multi-Infarct dementia in the home setting helps them cope by managing behavioral disturbances such as confusion, sleep problems, agitation, and aggression. This can usually be achieved by:

  • Prescribing low doses of medications for short periods of times
  • Removal of safety hazards
  • Assisting family members and other caregivers

It is important to note that medicines used to treat Alzheimer’s disease are ineffective at treating Multi-Infarct dementia.

Symptoms of Multi-Infarct Dementia:

The clinical features of dementia include:

  • Fragmentation of memory
  • Language problems – comprehension and expression
  • Reduced efficiency with activities of daily living
  • Behavioral and psychological symptoms – aggression, wandering, depression, anxiety. apathy
  • Personality and intellectual disintegration

Symptoms of vascular dementia may begin suddenly or gradually after each stroke. Some people with vascular dementia may improve for short periods but decline after having further “silent” strokes. The symptoms of a vascular stroke follow a stepwise progression — the dementia worsens with each stroke.

Causes of Multi-Infarct Dementia:

Multi-Infarct dementia is caused by a reduced flow of blood to the brain usually as a result of a series of small strokes. A stroke, also known as an infarct, is a disturbance in or blockage of the blood supply to any part of the brain. Multi-infarct means that more than one area in the brain has been injured due to a compromised blood supply.

Risk Factors for Multi-Infarct Dementia:

The following risk factors render a person more vulnerable to developing Multi-Infarct dementia:

  • Diabetes
  • Atherosclerosis – a furring or hardening of the arteries that can result in narrowing and blockage
  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke

Multi-Infarct or vascular dementia can often coexist with Alzheimer’s disease; this is known as mixed dementia.

Diagnosing Multi-Infarct Dementia:

Multi-Infarct dementia is diagnosed in a specialist setting usually by an older-age or later-life psychiatrist.

Treatment of Multi-Infarct Dementia:

There is no cure for Multi-Infarct dementia, and the aim of therapy is to treat risk factors and to prevent future strokes. This can be achieved by:

  • Lifestyle modification – by improving diet and exercising more
  • Moderating or eliminating alcohol consumption
  • Stopping smoking
  • Keeping a close eye on blood pressure to make sure that it is within a healthy range and, if not, starting anti-hypertensive medication
  • Blood thinners such as aspirin may also be started by the person’s doctor to help prevent clots from forming and clogging up arteries

Providing support to people with Multi-Infarct dementia in the home setting helps them cope by managing behavioral disturbances such as confusion, sleep problems, agitation, and aggression. This can usually be achieved by:

  • Prescribing low doses of medications for short periods of times
  • Removal of safety hazards
  • Assisting family members and other caregivers

It is important to note that medicines used to treat Alzheimer’s disease are ineffective at treating Multi-Infarct dementia.

Source MED LINE