Inhalant Dependency

Inhalant Dependency

Inhalant Dependency

Inhalants encompass a wide variety of chemicals and substances that are categorized together based on their method of administration: inhalation. People who are unable to control their inhalant use despite knowing the negative consequences and adverse health effects are generally considered to have an addiction.

People who use inhalants on a regular basis over a prolonged period of time can develop a physical and/or psychological dependence on the substance. Even those with an overwhelming desire to stop abusing inhalants may be unable to do so without professional support.

The ready availability and accessibility of inhalants at home and in stores may make it difficult for someone with a severe addiction to quit on their own. People don’t typically think of these products as drugs because they’re not manufactured with the intention for people to get high on them; nonetheless, some individuals use and abuse them for that purpose. Inhalants are most commonly used by children and adolescents.

Inhalants are dangerous, addictive, unstable, and flammable substances that vaporize at room temperature. Inhalants have psychoactive properties and produce short-lived, mind-altering effects. They include products that are easily purchased and found in the home or stores such as spray paints, markers, glues, and cleaning fluids.

Types Of Inhalants:

The classes of inhalants include:

  • Solvents – glue, nail polish, gasoline
  • Aerosols – spray paint, hairspray
  • Deodorant spray
  • Gases – butane lighters, nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”), chloroform
  • Nitrates – leather cleaner, liquid aroma

Health Effects of Inhalants:

Inhalant intoxication is characterized by:

  • Impaired judgment
  • Hallucinations
  • Excitability
  • Euphoria
  • Loss of self-control
  • Light-headedness
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of coordination
  • Blacking out
  • Slurred or distorted speech

The effects of inhalants last for a few minutes.

Risk Factors for Inhalants:

Inhalants are agents that act as central nervous system (CNS) depressants. As such, a higher dose of these substances can result in a lethal overdose — the consequence of heart failure or the drug causing death.

Additional adverse effects of inhalant use include:

  • Liver, kidney, nerve, and brain damage
  • Hearing loss
  • Delay in behavioral development

Treatment for Inhalant Dependency:

  • Assessment – It is important to have a substance abuse assessment completed by a drug and alcohol addiction specialist to determine the appropriate treatment for each individual with inhalant dependency.
  • Detox and rehab – Some individuals experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop taking inhalants. For these people, medically supervised detox and inpatient rehabilitation offer the best chances of a successful recovery.
  • Aftercare – Upon completion of detox, a patient receives aftercare, which includes psychoeducation — therapeutic support and education for the patient and family — for relapse prevention purposes.

Types Of Inhalants:

The classes of inhalants include:

  • Solvents – glue, nail polish, gasoline
  • Aerosols – spray paint, hairspray
  • Deodorant spray
  • Gases – butane lighters, nitrous oxide (“laughing gas”), chloroform
  • Nitrates – leather cleaner, liquid aroma

Health Effects of Inhalants:

Inhalant intoxication is characterized by:

  • Impaired judgment
  • Hallucinations
  • Excitability
  • Euphoria
  • Loss of self-control
  • Light-headedness
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of coordination
  • Blacking out
  • Slurred or distorted speech

The effects of inhalants last for a few minutes.

Risk factors for Inhalants:

Inhalants are agents that act as central nervous system (CNS) depressants. As such, a higher dose of these substances can result in a lethal overdose — the consequence of heart failure or the drug causing death.

Additional adverse effects of inhalant use include:

  • Liver, kidney, nerve, and brain damage
  • Hearing loss
  • Delay in behavioral development

Treatment for Inhalant Dependency:

  • Assessment – It is important to have a substance abuse assessment completed by a drug and alcohol addiction specialist to determine the appropriate treatment for each individual with inhalant dependency.
  • Detox and rehab – Some individuals experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop taking inhalants. For these people, medically supervised detox and inpatient rehabilitation offer the best chances of a successful recovery.
  • Aftercare – Upon completion of detox, a patient receives aftercare, which includes psychoeducation — therapeutic support and education for the patient and family — for relapse prevention purposes.
Source DRUG ABUSE | ADDICTION CENTER – What Is Addiction?