Inhalant Dependency2018-02-22T21:33:11+00:00

Inhalant Dependency

Inhalant Dependency

Inhalant Dependency

Inhalants are various products easily bought and found in the home or workplace such as spray paints, markers, glues, and cleaning fluids. They contain dangerous substances that have psychoactive (mind-altering) properties when inhaled. People don’t typically think of these products as drugs because they’re not intended for getting “high,” but some people use them for that purpose. When these substances are used for getting high, they are called inhalants. Inhalants are mostly used by young kids and teens and are the only class of substance used more by younger than by older teens.

Types Of Inhalants:

These substances include:

  • Solvents (liquids that become gas at room temperature)
  • Aerosol sprays
  • Gases
  • Nitrites (prescription medicines for chest pain)

Health Effects of Inhalants:

How do inhalants affect the brain?

Most inhalants affect the central nervous system and slow down brain activity. Short-term effects are similar to alcohol and include:

  • Slurred or distorted speech
  • Aerosol sprays
  • Lack of coordination (control of body movement)
  • Euphoria (feeling “high”)
  • Dizziness

People may also feel light-headed or have hallucinations (images/sensations that seem real but aren’t) or delusions (false beliefs). With repeated inhalations, many people feel less self-conscious and less in control. Some may start vomiting, feel drowsy for several hours, or have a headache that lasts a while.

Unlike other types of inhalants, nitrites, which are often prescribed to treat chest pain, are misused in order to improve sexual pleasure by expanding and relaxing blood vessels.

Long-term effects of inhalant use may include:

  • Liver and kidney damage
  • Hearing loss
  • Bone marrow damage
  • Loss of coordination and limb spasms (from nerve damage)
  • Delayed behavioral development (from brain problems)
  • Brain damage (from cut-off oxygen flow to the brain)

Can inhalants cause addiction, a form of substance use disorder?

Although it’s not very common, repeated use of inhalants can lead to addiction, a form of substance use disorder (SUD). An SUD develops when continued use of the drug causes issues, such as health problems and failure to meet responsibilities at work, school, or home. An SUD can range from mild to severe, the most severe form being addiction.

Treatment for Inhalant Dependency:

Some people seeking treatment for use of inhalants have found Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs.

Withdrawal Symptoms

Those who try to quit inhalants may have withdrawal symptoms that include:

  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia, Difficulty Sleeping
  • Mood Changes

Types Of Inhalants:

These substances include:

  • Solvents (liquids that become gas at room temperature)
  • Aerosol sprays
  • Gases
  • Nitrites (prescription medicines for chest pain)

Health Effects of Inhalants:

How do inhalants affect the brain?

Most inhalants affect the central nervous system and slow down brain activity. Short-term effects are similar to alcohol and include:

  • Slurred or distorted speech
  • Aerosol sprays
  • Lack of coordination (control of body movement)
  • Euphoria (feeling “high”)
  • Dizziness

People may also feel light-headed or have hallucinations (images/sensations that seem real but aren’t) or delusions (false beliefs). With repeated inhalations, many people feel less self-conscious and less in control. Some may start vomiting, feel drowsy for several hours, or have a headache that lasts a while.

Unlike other types of inhalants, nitrites, which are often prescribed to treat chest pain, are misused in order to improve sexual pleasure by expanding and relaxing blood vessels.

Long-term effects of inhalant use may include:

  • Liver and kidney damage
  • Hearing loss
  • Bone marrow damage
  • Loss of coordination and limb spasms (from nerve damage)
  • Delayed behavioral development (from brain problems)
  • Brain damage (from cut-off oxygen flow to the brain)

Can inhalants cause addiction, a form of substance use disorder?

Although it’s not very common, repeated use of inhalants can lead to addiction, a form of substance use disorder (SUD). An SUD develops when continued use of the drug causes issues, such as health problems and failure to meet responsibilities at work, school, or home. An SUD can range from mild to severe, the most severe form being addiction.

Treatment for Inhalant Dependency:

Some people seeking treatment for use of inhalants have found Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs.

Withdrawal Symptoms

Those who try to quit inhalants may have withdrawal symptoms that include:

  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia, Difficulty Sleeping
  • Mood Changes