Dependent Personality Disorder

Dependent Personality Disorder

Dependent Personality Disorder

Dependent personality disorder (DPD), formerly known as asthenic personality disorder, is a Cluster C Personality Disorder characterized by excessive reliance on others to meet one’s emotional and physical needs.

DPD can be conceptualized in terms of the following tetrad or group of four:

  1. Cognitive: A perception of oneself as inadequate, coupled with the belief that other people are powerful in comparison.
  2. Motivational: A desire to get and keep relationships with guardians, providers, and caregivers.
  3. Behavioral: A pattern of trying to make personal and social relationships stronger to minimize the possibility of abandonment and rejection.
  4. Emotional: Fear of abandonment, fear of rejection, and anxiety regarding the opinions of authority figures.

Prevalence

The onset of DPD is usually in early adulthood. 0.5% adults met the diagnostic criteria for DPD, and it is more common in females than it is in males.

Symptoms of Dependent Personality Disorder:

The symptoms of DPD include:

  • Complete passivity – non-resistant, pliable, deferent, meek
  • Devastation or helplessness when relationships come to an end
  • Avoidance of responsibilities
  • Extreme submission

Risk factors for Dependent Personality Disorder?

DPD is associated with significant impairment in functioning at home, work, school, or social settings.

Diagnosing Dependent Personality Disorder:

At least five out of the following eight features must be present for a diagnosis of DPD to be made:

  • 1. – Difficulty in making everyday decisions without an excessive amount of advice and reassurance from others
  • 2. – Needs others to assume responsibility for most major areas of their life
  • 3. – Has difficulty expressing disagreement with others because of fear of loss of support or approval
  • 4. – Has difficulty initiating projects or doing things on their own – because of a lack of self confidence in judgment or abilities rather than a lack of motivation or energy
  • 5. – Goes to excessive lengths to obtain support from others, to the point of volunteering to do things that are unpleasant
  • 6. – Feels uncomfortable or helpless when alone because of exaggerated fears of being unable to care for themself
  • 7. – Urgently seeks another relationship as a source of care and support when a close relationship comes to an end
  • 8. – Is unrealistically preoccupied with fears of being left to take care of themself

Causes of Dependent Personality Disorder:

The exact cause of DPD remains unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors are thought to be contributors.

People with a family history of DPD are at increased risk of developing this condition. Adverse childhood experiences such as sexual abuse also render a person more vulnerable to developing DPD.

Dependent Personality Disorder complications:

Complications of DPD include alcohol or substance abuse; major depressive disorder; increased likelihood of emotional, sexual, or physical abuse; suicidal behavior; and self-harm.

Treatment for Dependent Personality Disorder:

Psychotherapy (talk therapy) is the mainstay of treatment for people with DPD. The main aims of this are to:

  • Make people with this condition more independent
  • Provide them with the tools to form healthy relationships with the people around them by improving self-esteem and boosting confidence

Symptoms of Dependent Personality Disorder:

The symptoms of DPD include:

  • Complete passivity – non-resistant, pliable, deferent, meek
  • Devastation or helplessness when relationships come to an end
  • Avoidance of responsibilities
  • Extreme submission

Risk factors for Dependent Personality Disorder?

DPD is associated with significant impairment in functioning at home, work, school, or social settings.

Diagnosing Dependent Personality Disorder:

At least five out of the following eight features must be present for a diagnosis of DPD to be made:

  • 1. – Difficulty in making everyday decisions without an excessive amount of advice and reassurance from others
  • 2. – Needs others to assume responsibility for most major areas of their life
  • 3. – Has difficulty expressing disagreement with others because of fear of loss of support or approval
  • 4. – Has difficulty initiating projects or doing things on their own – because of a lack of self confidence in judgment or abilities rather than a lack of motivation or energy
  • 5. – Goes to excessive lengths to obtain support from others, to the point of volunteering to do things that are unpleasant
  • 6. – Feels uncomfortable or helpless when alone because of exaggerated fears of being unable to care for themself
  • 7. – Urgently seeks another relationship as a source of care and support when a close relationship comes to an end
  • 8. – Is unrealistically preoccupied with fears of being left to take care of themself

Causes of Dependent Personality Disorder:

The exact cause of DPD remains unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors are thought to be contributors.

People with a family history of DPD are at increased risk of developing this condition. Adverse childhood experiences such as sexual abuse also render a person more vulnerable to developing DPD.

Possible Dependent Personality Disorder complications may include:

Complications of DPD include alcohol or substance abuse; major depressive disorder; increased likelihood of emotional, sexual, or physical abuse; suicidal behavior; and self-harm.

Treatment for Dependent Personality Disorder:

Psychotherapy (talk therapy) is the mainstay of treatment for people with DPD. The main aims of this are to:

  • Make people with this condition more independent
  • Provide them with the tools to form healthy relationships with the people around them by improving self-esteem and boosting confidence
Sources MED LINE | WIKIPEDIA – Dependent Personality Disorder