Brief Psychotic Disorder

Brief Psychotic Disorder

Brief Psychotic Disorder

Brief psychotic disorder (BPD) is a mental health condition characterized by the presence of at least one psychotic symptom — such as delusions, hallucinations, incoherent speech, or behavioral disturbances — which lasts from one day to one month in duration and which is often accompanied by significant distress.

BPD is usually preceded by a significant stressor such as bereavement or childbirth.

Prevalence

The male to female ratio of BPD is 1:2, and the condition is more common in people with personality disorder. The onset of symptoms of BPD is usually in the late 30s and early 40s. The rates of BPD are higher in the developing world than in the developed world.

Symptoms of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

There are three types of BPD:

  • 1. – BPD with marked stressor(s)— also known as brief reactive psychosis. The onset of psychotic symptoms occurs following a traumatic event that would be stressful for anyone in similar circumstances in the same culture.
  • 2. – BPD without marked stressor(s) is the onset of psychotic symptoms that occur in the absence of a traumatic event that would be stressful for anyone in similar circumstances in the same culture.
  • 3. – BPD with postpartum onset is defined as the onset of psychotic symptoms that occur within four weeks of childbirth.

Diagnosis of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

To make a diagnosis of BPD, other conditions with psychotic symptoms such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, or bipolar affective disorder must be ruled out. Medical conditions, such as a brain tumour, and misuse of illicit drugs must also be excluded.

Causes of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

The exact cause of BPD remains unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors have been implicated.

BPD is more common in people who have a family history of major depressive disorder or bipolar affective disorder.

It has been suggested that people who have poor coping strategies are at an increased risk of developing BPD because they can tend to try to “escape” from reality when it’s overwhelming and frightening.

Treatment of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

Treatment for BPD includes medication and/or psychotherapy

Medication – antipsychotics such as Olanzapine. Medication can be associated with adverse effects such as weight gain and must be managed and monitored by a psychiatrist.

Psychotherapy – cognitive behavioral therapy.

Admission – Hospitalization may be necessary if symptoms are severe and if the patient has thoughts of harming self and/or others or is exhibiting suicidal and/or homicidal behavior.

People with this condition experience a complete resolution of symptoms and return to their previous level of functioning, although BPD can occur on more than one occasion with complete remission between episodes.

Symptoms of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

There are three types of BPD:

  • 1. – BPD with marked stressor(s)— also known as brief reactive psychosis. The onset of psychotic symptoms occurs following a traumatic event that would be stressful for anyone in similar circumstances in the same culture.
  • 2. – BPD without marked stressor(s) is the onset of psychotic symptoms that occur in the absence of a traumatic event that would be stressful for anyone in similar circumstances in the same culture.
  • 3. – BPD with postpartum onset is defined as the onset of psychotic symptoms that occur within four weeks of childbirth.

Diagnosis of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

To make a diagnosis of BPD, other conditions with psychotic symptoms such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, or bipolar affective disorder must be ruled out. Medical conditions, such as a brain tumour, and misuse of illicit drugs must also be excluded.

Causes of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

The exact cause of BPD remains unknown; however, genetic and environmental factors have been implicated.

BPD is more common in people who have a family history of major depressive disorder or bipolar affective disorder.

It has been suggested that people who have poor coping strategies are at an increased risk of developing BPD because they can tend to try to “escape” from reality when it’s overwhelming and frightening.

Treatment of Brief Psychotic Disorder:

Treatment for BPD includes medication and/or psychotherapy

Medication – antipsychotics such as Olanzapine. Medication can be associated with adverse effects such as weight gain and must be managed and monitored by a psychiatrist.

Psychotherapy – cognitive behavioral therapy.

Admission – Hospitalization may be necessary if symptoms are severe and if the patient has thoughts of harming self and/or others or is exhibiting suicidal and/or homicidal behavior.

People with this condition experience a complete resolution of symptoms and return to their previous level of functioning, although BPD can occur on more than one occasion with complete remission between episodes.

Source MEDLINE | WIKIPEDIA – Schizophrenia | WIKIPEDIA – Schizoaffective | WIKIPEDIA – Delusional | WIKIPEDIA – Bipolar Disorder |