Agoraphobia2018-09-27T13:08:49+00:00

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia is an intense fear and anxiety of being in places where it is hard to escape, or where help might not be available. Agoraphobia usually involves fear of crowds, bridges, or of being outside alone. The exact cause of agoraphobia is unknown. Agoraphobia sometimes occurs when a person has had a panic attack and begins to fear situations that might lead to another panic attack.

Symptoms of Agoraphobia:

Emotional symptoms can include:

Physical symptoms can include:

  • Being afraid of spending time alone
  • Being afraid of places where escape might be hard
  • Being afraid of losing control in a public place
  • Depending on others
  • Feeling detached or separated from others
  • Feeling helpless
  • Feeling that the body is not real
  • Feeling that the environment is not real
  • Having an unusual temper or agitation
  • Staying in the house for long periods
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Choking
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Nausea or other stomach distress
  • Racing heart
  • Short of breath
  • Sweating
  • Trembling

Treatment for Agoraphobia:

Your healthcare provider will look at your history of agoraphobia, and will get a description of the behavior from you, your family, or friends. The goal of treatment is to help you feel and function better. Treatments for agoraphobia include psychotherapy, medication, or both. One form of psychotherapy that has been shown effective in treating agoraphobia in research is cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). CBT targets a person’s thoughts and actions and attempts to change them in order to alleviate anxious feelings and worries. Medications include anti-anxiety medications and antidepressants. Antidepressants can be used to treat both depressive and agoraphobia disorders. They are different from anti-anxiety medications in that they generally take a few weeks to go into effect and one has to take them consistently. A combination of psychotherapy and medications has shown to be an effective in treating agoraphobia.

Medications for Agoraphobia can include:

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are most often the first choice of antidepressant
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are another choice.

Causes of Agoraphobia:

The exact cause of agoraphobia is unknown. Agoraphobia sometimes occurs when a person has had a panic attack and begins to fear situations that might lead to another panic attack.

Symptoms of Agoraphobia:

Emotional symptoms can include:

  • Being afraid of spending time alone
  • Being afraid of places where escape might be hard
  • Being afraid of losing control in a public place
  • Depending on others
  • Feeling detached or separated from others
  • Feeling helpless
  • Feeling that the body is not real
  • Feeling that the environment is not real
  • Having an unusual temper or agitation
  • Staying in the house for long periods

Physical symptoms can include:

  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Choking
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Nausea or other stomach distress
  • Racing heart
  • Short of breath
  • Sweating
  • Trembling

Treatment for Agoraphobia:

Your healthcare provider will look at your history of agoraphobia, and will get a description of the behavior from you, your family, or friends. The goal of treatment is to help you feel and function better. Treatments for agoraphobia include psychotherapy, medication, or both. One form of psychotherapy that has been shown effective in treating agoraphobia in research is cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). CBT targets a person’s thoughts and actions and attempts to change them in order to alleviate anxious feelings and worries. Medications include anti-anxiety medications and antidepressants. Antidepressants can be used to treat both depressive and agoraphobia disorders. They are different from anti-anxiety medications in that they generally take a few weeks to go into effect and one has to take them consistently. A combination of psychotherapy and medications has shown to be an effective in treating agoraphobia.

Medications for Agoraphobia can include:

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are most often the first choice of antidepressant
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are another choice.

Causes of Agoraphobia:

The exact cause of agoraphobia is unknown. Agoraphobia sometimes occurs when a person has had a panic attack and begins to fear situations that might lead to another panic attack.