Alcoholic Dementia

Alcoholic Dementia

Alcoholic Dementia

A is characterized by impaired executive functioning — planning, thinking, and judgment. Other features of alcoholic dementia include:

  • Deficits with attention, concentration, and memory
  • Profound changes in personality
  • Reduced impulse control and emotional dysregulation — which can result in socially inappropriate behavior such as sexual disinhibition in public places

Treatment for Alcoholic Dementia:

If alcoholic dementia is detected early, the effects may be reversed.

  • The person with this condition must modify their lifestyle and gradually stop drinking alcohol in a controlled manner. They are usually referred to a drug and alcohol addiction service where they will receive professional and expert support.
  • It is important to commence a healthy diet and begin replacement therapy for vitamin deficiency such as thiamine.
  • Relapse prevention forms an important part of aftercare, and medicines can be prescribed to reduce cravings.

Alcohol Related Brain Damage

Alcohol Related Brain Damage (ARBD) is caused by consuming excessive amounts of alcohol over a prolonged period of time. ARBD is an umbrella term that encompasses three conditions: Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Korsakoff’s syndrome, and alcoholic dementia.

Wernicke’s encephalopathy is of sudden onset and is characterized by the triad of

  • Mobility and balance problems – broad based or drunken type of walking
  • Altered mental state – confusion
  • Nystagmus – abnormal eye movements
Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible condition; however, if left untreated, it can progress to
Korsakoff’s syndrome.

Korsakoff’s syndrome develops gradually and is characterized by:

  • Deficits in attention and concentration
  • Gaps in memory, which are usually filled with false or inaccurate information
  • Psychotic symptoms such as auditory, visual, and tactile hallucinations and delusional beliefs

Korsakoff’s syndrome can lead to coma and death if left untreated. Wernicke’s encephalopathy can coexist with Korsakoff’s syndrome — called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Cause and Treatment
Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency contributes to the development of Wernicke’s encephalopathy and Korsakoff’s syndrome, so treatment involves replacement therapy in a hospital setting.

Treatment for Alcoholic Dementia:

If alcoholic dementia is detected early, the effects may be reversed.

  • The person with this condition must modify their lifestyle and gradually stop drinking alcohol in a controlled manner. They are usually referred to a drug and alcohol addiction service where they will receive professional and expert support.
  • It is important to commence a healthy diet and begin replacement therapy for vitamin deficiency such as thiamine.
  • Relapse prevention forms an important part of aftercare, and medicines can be prescribed to reduce cravings.
 

Alcohol Related Brain Damage

Alcohol Related Brain Damage (ARBD) is caused by consuming excessive amounts of alcohol over a prolonged period of time. ARBD is an umbrella term that encompasses three conditions: Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Korsakoff’s syndrome, and alcoholic dementia.

Wernicke’s encephalopathy is of sudden onset and is characterized by the triad of

  • Mobility and balance problems – broad based or drunken type of walking
  • Altered mental state – confusion
  • Nystagmus – abnormal eye movements
Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible condition; however, if left untreated, it can progress to
Korsakoff’s syndrome.

Korsakoff’s syndrome develops gradually and is characterized by:

  • Deficits in attention and concentration
  • Gaps in memory, which are usually filled with false or inaccurate information
  • Psychotic symptoms such as auditory, visual, and tactile hallucinations and delusional beliefs

Korsakoff’s syndrome can lead to coma and death if left untreated. Wernicke’s encephalopathy can coexist with Korsakoff’s syndrome — called Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Cause and Treatment
Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency contributes to the development of Wernicke’s encephalopathy and Korsakoff’s syndrome, so treatment involves replacement therapy in a hospital setting.

Source WIKIPEDIA